Monthly Archives: September 2016

How to Hiring the Best Web Designer

Hiring a web design can be an exciting process. When I talk about hiring a web design in this post, the advice can be applied in a variety of ways. First, it could mean hiring a single, usually freelance, designer for a job you need to be done. It could also refer to a web design agency.

Additionally, it could be advice for hiring a web designer for your own team. The advice is valuable for web designers who are looking to improve their portfolio. Now, let’s discuss five different but important things when trying to hire a web designer.

 

The work shows off responsive design

It’s still surprising how many times responsive designs don’t make it into a web designer portfolio. It’s hard to say if a designer is capable of delivering responsive design if it’s not there. It could be omitted by mistake or because they have never done it. You can’t tell if it’s not there. Now, this guide refers to a web designer.

The web is a flexible medium that works on the tiniest devices and their tiny screens to larger devices and their larger screens. It’s important for any website to have a good responsive design. At this point in time, there is no excuse in not at least including a screenshot of the responsive design as part of a project’s case study.

Jenny Johannesson shows off the responsive design in her portfolio. Her case study on Internet.org starts off with working on the project with a mobile first approach. That’s huge! It’s actually quite impressive too. In her case study, mobile devices aren’t even an afterthought. They are a central part of her project and how she approached it.

 

The Best Web Designer Ideas

Hiring a web design can be an exciting process. When I talk about hiring a web design in this post, the advice can be applied in a variety of ways. First, it could mean hiring a single, usually freelance, designer for a job you need to be done. It could also refer to a web design agency.

Additionally, it could be advice for hiring a web designer for your own team. The advice is valuable for web designers who are looking to improve their portfolio. Now, let’s discuss five different but important things when trying to hire a web designer.

 

The work shows off responsive design

It’s still surprising how many times responsive designs don’t make it into a web designer portfolio. It’s hard to say if a designer is capable of delivering responsive design if it’s not there. It could be omitted by mistake or because they have never done it. You can’t tell if it’s not there. Now, this guide refers to a web designer.

The web is a flexible medium that works on the tiniest devices and their tiny screens to larger devices and their larger screens. It’s important for any website to have a good responsive design. At this point in time, there is no excuse in not at least including a screenshot of the responsive design as part of a project’s case study.

Jenny Johannesson shows off the responsive design in her portfolio. Her case study on Internet.org starts off with working on the project with a mobile first approach. That’s huge! It’s actually quite impressive too. In her case study, mobile devices aren’t even an afterthought. They are a central part of her project and how she approached it.

Additional, the portfolio of Toy Fight includes a case study for Outpost. As part of the case study, the agency includes a section for mobile design. They explain that the approach towards mobile design was well fitting for mobile just as it was for the desktop design of Outpost’s website.

 

The work includes research

Every web design project should start with some sort of research. Research allows you to start the project in the right direction, on the right foot. There are so many different ways to go about research. There is no single method of getting insight.

Research can include things such as user interviews, AB testing, analytics and metrics, heat maps, heuristic evaluations, personas and scenarios, surveys, or usability studies, among many other.

Whats The Trends For Modal Windows On The Web

Modal windows are those popup windows that appear over the screen rather than opening a new tab/window. They usually darken the background to bring attention to the popup.

Most websites running modal windows add some type of call to action whether it’s a button or a form or something. But it can also be a simple message about browser features like disabled JavaScript or an adblock extension.

Everything in the window takes precedence over the page so these modals are meant to draw attention. They can be annoying and outright infuriating but numbers don’t lie: they work.

Let’s delve a bit into current trends of modal windows to see how they work and why you’d use them.

 

Dark Backgrounds & Clickable Areas

Modal windows follow a similar design strategy and they’re not very complicated.

They mostly all use a darkened background on the page to bring attention to the modal content. This shouldn’t be a pitch black background because that can feel intimidating.

Instead the user should see a touch of the page behind the background, but it should have a reduced opacity. This could be 90% or 50% depending on how much you want to hide the page.

This isn’t universal but I hate when designers remove or ignore this feature. Yes there’s usually an X button or close button, however it takes more effort to move the mouse onto that button.

It should be possible to just click the background and hide the message right away.

Some modals use fancy animations to appear on the screen. This is usually preferred because it reduces the harshness of a random popup.

Having the modal window slide, fade, or bounce into view makes it a touch easier on the eyes. But don’t drag out the animation either!

Most users will ignore the modal so they don’t want to watch a full 3 second animation. Get to the modal quickly and let the user either read or close the window.

Designs vary from site to site but most of them use a white modal background with dark text. It’s the simplest way to design a high-contrast message that can blend with any website.

Overall these are some basic trends so they’re not absolute. But keep your eyes open as you browse the Internet because you may be surprised how many different styles are out there.

 

Display Techniques

There are some popular trends used by marketers who want to display modal windows for certain visitors.

The vast majority of modal popups happen a few seconds after the pageload. Most visitors haven’t even had time to read through the site to understand what it’s about. This seems like the worst way to do modals unless they’re informational for things like cookies or adblock settings.

Other display styles typically work better since they’re geared towards user behaviors. Here are the three most common techniques:

  • Exit modals appear when the user’s mouse leaves the page
  • Timed modals run after X seconds/minutes
  • Location modals appear when the user scrolls down a certain amount

Each scenario is different and should be used based on the audience.

If you run a blog with lengthy content like Smashing Magazine then you might do a scroll-based popup. Other blogs like WPBeginner actually did the exit modal strategy and saw a huge increase in daily email signups.

There’s no denying that this stuff works. It’s just a matter of how you’re willing to run modals and what the end goal is.

Great Icons Can Affect The User Experience

Interfaces are all about communication and getting things done. A website’s UI is a means to an end, and the designer’s job is to create an interface that helps the user reach that end quickly.

Icons are perfect for interfaces because they convey meaning without words. Users can learn how an interface works just by studying the visuals and interacting with the elements.

In this post I’ll cover a few different ways to use icons to improve the quality of UX on a website. There are no perfect uses but there are commonalities between great icons and an improved user experience.

 

Enhanced Navigation

Icons naturally help users navigate through a website based on visuals alone. The best icons are the ones that most people recognize so you always want to stick with these first.

Tim includes icons above each link label to distinguish between purpose and behavior. It’s one of the clearest methods for icon use because it’s easy to see and easy to understand.

Always remember to include text labels for links too. Pure icons for navigation rarely works, or at least it’s not the best case for usability.

Another really important icon is the three-bar menu icon. This is also called the hamburger menu and while many designers hate it, more people are slowly realizing what this symbol means.

The menu on Inc is another great example showing how icons tie into navigation.

The menu link uses the hamburger icon but it also has label text reading “menu” underneath. This clarifies the icon’s intent and makes it easier for mobile users to find the navigation.

Plus when the nav is visible users will get small plus signs next to nav links. These icons indicate a sliding drawer of sub-links, kind of like dropdown links but designed for mobile.

Another popular trend is the mega navigation dropdown menu. This can be found on sites like Mashable and each link has a small downward-facing arrow to indicate a dropdown menu.